The Silverspoon

For those of us who like to cook, we are always in search of the perfect cookbook. But what makes a perfect cookbook? Can there really be just one?

The reason I love cookbooks is because there are literally thousands of viewpoints on different techniques, cuisines, themes, and so on. Whenever I am traveling, I usually like to buy a cookbook that is written for locals versus something that is made for tourists because it tends to be a lot more authentic and is fascinating to see how different authors around the world communicate to their readers about food and cooking.

One of my favorite books to cook out of is The Silverspoon, which is exactly that. A cookbook for Italians that includes all the dishes that Italians like to eat and prepare. The edition that I own has been adapted for English-speaking readers. According to the book, English language cookbooks usually  have very detailed step by step descriptions for how to prepare the dish. Although its been adapted for English-speaking readers, the authors of The Silverspoon, made a huge effort to maintain the authenticity of the recipes and include some ingredients or methods that may seem unusual to us. For example, the other night I made Bread Soup with Tomato, something I had never had and didn’t know how it should taste. It was interesting because the recipe was quite bland for my palate and I ended up dousing the soup with Sriracha and added way more salt than I think it calls for.

What I think this book was intended to do, was to give its readers a basic understanding of Italian food and cooking, and to encourage cooks to branch out on their own. I have cooked a couple of things out of this book and so far, it has been a great learning experience and, thanks to the support of my husband, I have decided to cook my way through this book in an effort to learn more about Italian cooking and to further my skills as a chef! Coming up….Shrimp Risotto!!

Back from Hiatus

Hello all,

I am back. I have to apologize for my disappearance. With a wedding (!) to plan and survive, and a little life challenges to deal with, I have not exactly been inspired to write. But now I am back! And back for good. I  have been doing a lot of cooking and a lot of eating. And even dabbling back into home baking. Starting slowly, like someone suffering from PTSD, with the occasional cake or quick bread here and there, I feel like I am finally feeling at ease with my dear o’l friend, Ms. Kitchen Aid, who has been sadly staring at me from her neglected corner.

Maybe I should explain.For those who know, I am a pastry chef in Los Angeles, who has lost her passion for home baking, because honestly after 10-12 hours of doing anything for a living who wants to do it all over again when they get home? Not me! But I realized, this was my go-to meditation, this was where I felt at home. Mixing batters and doughs, creaming butter, proofing bread, I loved it all. I decided that in order to reignite my passion for baking at home, I have got to get (slowly) back into it.

One of the problems that arose with my home baking is that I had all these ridiculous standards for myself for perfection and doing everything the 5 star, 5 diamond way. This is not the case at home. It should be relaxed and rewarding, and sometimes it should be a failure. It shouldn’t matter if you can bake 10,000 macaroons (not an exaggeration) in 8 hours, or make a $10,000 cake for one of the wealthiest royal families before lunch. It should be on my terms; when I want, how I want, and if I want.

That being said, I have to remember that when I am feeling like I am reverting to my old ways, I need to take a deep breath, step back, and appreciate the way baking makes me feel and how rewarding it can be. Because I really don’t want to lose one of my oldest and dearest friends; good o’l Ms. Kitchen Aid.